Category: Client Education

Proposed Bill to Affect Pet Care

Dear friends,

As many of you may already know, there has been a bit of a storm brewing in the veterinary community of South Carolina and the rest of the country over the issue of low-cost practices and rescue organizations providing  medical services i.e. spay/ neuter, vaccinations, parasite treatment and microchip implantation.  The concern of some of our veterinarian colleagues is that their income may be compromised by these organizations which have an unfair advantage of providing these services at a sometimes significantly discounted price due to less stringent regulation and various subsidizing resources.

As veterinarians and practice owners, Leslie and I fully understand our colleague’s concern and agree on some of the issues; however we are very concerned about this proposed legislation.  We have always worked hard to promote better health and care for the animals of our community, both the ones with a family and those without.  We also are painfully aware of the many animals that go uncared for, that are neglected, that are homeless and are in homes in which the people do not have the means to fully and properly care for them.

Leslie and I are concerned that this animal welfare legislation S.687  has very little to do with promoting or improving the welfare of animals and more about protecting the veterinary communities own financial interest.  Our greatest concern is the restriction of the ability of nonprofit organizations and other animal welfare groups to reach and care for those that are currently not being cared for.  We know there are many pets in our community that are not under the care of a veterinarian due to a multitude of reasons (financial, transportation, education, etc.) which as a result of this legislation will now be “untouchable” by organizations that are designed specifically to provide care for those pets.  These are pets that would not darken the door of a veterinary office to begin with, but if this legislation passes, would now not be able to get the care so very much needed.  All because of the action of the community that took an oath to care for them!

Leslie and I are passionate about our calling.  We are also disheartened by the organization and community that we love being a part of.  We, however, are not politicians or understand what it is to be an activist, so we are reaching out to those that we know and respect who are of similar mind and are asking for your help.  Please contact your senator (Lawrence Grooms or Paul Campbell, Jr of Berkeley & Charleston counties)  that is on the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources  and let them know about your concern.  We would love to hear from you about your thoughts and opinions and of course any advice and help you may have on what we can do to make this a better piece of legislation.

Sincerely,

David Steele, DVM   Leslie Steele, DVM

Veterinarians/Owners of Advanced Animal Care of Mount Pleasant

(No contact info) ADVANCED ANIMAL CARE logo

 

 

 

Cold Weather and Your Pets

N-Pets-in-cold-weather

It is difficult to see all the images thrown at us online of domesticated pets freezing to death outside. What is even more heartbreaking is seeing it with our own eyes. Although many people do comply with obvious pet care standards by bringing their pets inside during the coldest of nights, so many of our neighbors do not. It is important to help spread the word to others about the importance of making sure these animals have a warm place to sleep. It is understood that some people will NOT bring their “outside” dog or cat indoors, but there are ways you can make sure they have a warm shelter whether inside or not.

Here are a couple tips on how to keep those pets warm this winter:

Food & Water. Outdoor pets will require more calories during cold weather to generate more body heat to help keep them warm. Some pet owners think it is helpful to keep their pet’s weight on the heavy side to help protect them from the cold, but this is not true. It is more important that they keep and maintain a healthy body condition.  It is imperative that your pet has unlimited access to clean, non-frozen drinking water.

Shelter. Provide a warm, solid, dry structure that protects against gusts of winds. The floor of the shelter should be off the ground to help minimize loss of body heat. The door of the shelter should be positioned away from prevailing winds. Space heaters and heat lamps should be avoided because of risk of burns or fire. Exercise extreme caution when using heated pet mats which can also be capable of causing burns.         dog-shelter-2

Bedding. Bedding should be thick, dry, and changed regularly to provide a warm, dry environment.

ID Tags. It is very easy for cats and dogs to become lost during the winter. If they are not in a fenced in yard, they may start wondering in hopes of finding adequate shelter. Be sure your pets have a microchip, and/or collar with identification tags in case they are picked up and brought to a rescue or shelter.

Cars. Cats will often find temporary shelter underneath a car, on a tire, or even under the hood. Make sure to check your car before starting the engine and driving away. A couple knocks on the hood should be enough to wake up a sleeping kitty. It is also important not to leave your pets in the car during the winter, just as it is during the summer. Cars can serve as a type of refrigerator and keep the cold inside. Remember that puppies and kittens have an even harder time adapting to cold weather than adults.

Even if you do not own any outside dogs or cats, you can still provide temporarily shelter for the stray pets in your neighborhood. Styrofoam coolers with dry bedding and a small hole cut for an opening, can provide a makeshift shelter for stray felines, and is very cost effective. Please speak out if you see a pet left in the cold. If we all do what we can, then more and more pets will be able to survive the harsh winter. 

cat cooler         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information please call Advanced Animal Care of Mt. Pleasant @ 843-884-9838.

Sources:

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cold-weather-pet-safety.aspx

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cold-weather-tips

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/protect_pets_winter.html

http://cedarspringspost.com/2013/01/24/cold-weather-dangerous-for-pets/