Tag: advanced animal care of mount pleasant

Dr. Megan Hardy Joins AAC Family

Dr. Hardy with her dog, Meeko.

We are excited to announce Dr. Megan Hardy has joined the AAC family! She hails from Lexington, Kentucky where she was born and raised. She obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Kentucky, and completed her rigorous veterinary medical training at the College of Veterinary Medicine of Auburn University (War Eagle!). We first got to meet Dr. Hardy when she completed her professional training this spring with a preceptorship program here in our practice. Our doctors and staff were so impressed with her skills that we offered her a long-term position starting this September.

Dr. Hardy will be seeing patients Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and some Saturdays. She will provide services in general medicine and preventative health with a focus in small animal dentistry.

Call us at 843-884-9838 to schedule your pet’s next appointment.

Proposed Bill to Affect Pet Care

Dear friends,

As many of you may already know, there has been a bit of a storm brewing in the veterinary community of South Carolina and the rest of the country over the issue of low-cost practices and rescue organizations providing  medical services i.e. spay/ neuter, vaccinations, parasite treatment and microchip implantation.  The concern of some of our veterinarian colleagues is that their income may be compromised by these organizations which have an unfair advantage of providing these services at a sometimes significantly discounted price due to less stringent regulation and various subsidizing resources.

As veterinarians and practice owners, Leslie and I fully understand our colleague’s concern and agree on some of the issues; however we are very concerned about this proposed legislation.  We have always worked hard to promote better health and care for the animals of our community, both the ones with a family and those without.  We also are painfully aware of the many animals that go uncared for, that are neglected, that are homeless and are in homes in which the people do not have the means to fully and properly care for them.

Leslie and I are concerned that this animal welfare legislation S.687  has very little to do with promoting or improving the welfare of animals and more about protecting the veterinary communities own financial interest.  Our greatest concern is the restriction of the ability of nonprofit organizations and other animal welfare groups to reach and care for those that are currently not being cared for.  We know there are many pets in our community that are not under the care of a veterinarian due to a multitude of reasons (financial, transportation, education, etc.) which as a result of this legislation will now be “untouchable” by organizations that are designed specifically to provide care for those pets.  These are pets that would not darken the door of a veterinary office to begin with, but if this legislation passes, would now not be able to get the care so very much needed.  All because of the action of the community that took an oath to care for them!

Leslie and I are passionate about our calling.  We are also disheartened by the organization and community that we love being a part of.  We, however, are not politicians or understand what it is to be an activist, so we are reaching out to those that we know and respect who are of similar mind and are asking for your help.  Please contact your senator (Lawrence Grooms or Paul Campbell, Jr of Berkeley & Charleston counties)  that is on the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources  and let them know about your concern.  We would love to hear from you about your thoughts and opinions and of course any advice and help you may have on what we can do to make this a better piece of legislation.

Sincerely,

David Steele, DVM   Leslie Steele, DVM

Veterinarians/Owners of Advanced Animal Care of Mount Pleasant

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With a Little Help From Our Friends….

Friends, we need some help finding homes for four cats. Actually two pairs.

In the ideal situation, we get kittens at a very young age before they have become conditioned to fear humans. Some kittens learn this from their mothers very, very soon after birth.  When we take in kittens that are 8-12 weeks old before they’ve known human contact, they tend to retain these “shy” characteristics even after they’ve learned that most people are “good” and would never hurt them. Their instinct is to retain a certain amount of healthy distrust, just to be on the safe side.  These are the cats that will run up to you for treats, talk to you and maybe even rub against your leg. They may also like to be petted and rubbed, but are most likely rarely going to want to be picked up.

We have two pairs of kitties that are somewhat “shy”. In addition to being born to feral mothers, they have lived the majority of their lives in a veterinary hospital. And while they are loved and cared for daily, it is not a true home. They deserve to have their own family.

Storm and Elmo:

Storm is an 18 mo old female/spayed dilute tortishell (patches of grey and peach). She was found as a tiny kitten in a dumpster on Clements Ferry Road. She is very independent and extremely active and athletic. Elmo is an 18 mo male/neutered black cat that has an absolutely fantastic personality. He is a third generation of a family of cats living under the cottages at Charles Pinckney Elementary School in Mt Pleasant. He is very, very smart and always very busy.  Both love to play and are very attached to one another.

Storm & Elmo

Pictured: Elmo (black) left, Storm (gray) right

Darwin and Jax:

Darwin is a 12 mo old male/neutered red and white tabby. He was found stray at about 8 weeks of age with his sister. After she was soon adopted, Darwin became a bit withdrawn and became less interactive. Jax is a 9 mo old male/neutered back cat with adorable linx tips on his ears.  Jax was also born beneath a cottage at Pinckney Elementary school; but probably 4th or 5th generation. He has always been very  shy, and therefore sat back as he watched his siblings being adopted out one by one. He and Darwin bonded instantly and are rarely seen very far apart. They are also very active, inquisitive cats that need more of a life than a clinic has to offer.

All four of these cats are extremely healthy and hardy. In addition to routine vaccinations, they have had the opportunity to develop real life immunity by growing up in an animal hospital. They are all smart, inquisitive and beautiful cats. They would all benefit from safe outdoor time as they would love to run and play and hunt. If you have room in your heart for either of these pairs of kitties, please let us know. Adoption fees are negotiable. For more information click here.

Darwin Sept 2014 Jax

Pictured: Darwin (orange) left, Jax (black) right

“The love for all living creatures is the noblest attribute of man.” – Charles Darwin