Tag: dog

Cold Weater and Your Pets

N-Pets-in-cold-weather

It is difficult to see all the images thrown at us online of domesticated pets freezing to death outside. What is even more heartbreaking is seeing it with our own eyes. Although many people do comply with obvious pet care standards by bringing their pets inside during the coldest of nights, so many of our neighbors do not. It is important to help spread the word to others about the importance of making sure these animals have a warm place to sleep. It is understood that some people will NOT bring their “outside” dog or cat indoors, but there are ways you can make sure they have a warm shelter whether inside or not.

Here are a couple tips on how to keep those pets warm this winter:

Food & Water. Outdoor pets will require more calories during cold weather to generate more body heat to help keep them warm. Some pet owners think it is helpful to keep their pet’s weight on the heavy side to help protect them from the cold, but this is not true. It is more important that they keep and maintain a healthy body condition.  It is imperative that your pet has unlimited access to clean, non-frozen drinking water.

Shelter. Provide a warm, solid, dry structure that protects against gusts of winds. The floor of the shelter should be off the ground to help minimize loss of body heat. The door of the shelter should be positioned away from prevailing winds. Space heaters and heat lamps should be avoided because of risk of burns or fire. Exercise extreme caution when using heated pet mats which can also be capable of causing burns.         dog-shelter-2

Bedding. Bedding should be thick, dry, and changed regularly to provide a warm, dry environment.

ID Tags. It is very easy for cats and dogs to become lost during the winter. If they are not in a fenced in yard, they may start wondering in hopes of finding adequate shelter. Be sure your pets have a microchip, and/or collar with identification tags in case they are picked up and brought to a rescue or shelter.

Cars. Cats will often find temporary shelter underneath a car, on a tire, or even under the hood. Make sure to check your car before starting the engine and driving away. A couple knocks on the hood should be enough to wake up a sleeping kitty. It is also important not to leave your pets in the car during the winter, just as it is during the summer. Cars can serve as a type of refrigerator and keep the cold inside. Remember that puppies and kittens have an even harder time adapting to cold weather than adults.

Even if you do not own any outside dogs or cats, you can still provide temporarily shelter for the stray pets in your neighborhood. Styrofoam coolers with dry bedding and a small hole cut for an opening, can provide a makeshift shelter for stray felines, and is very cost effective. Please speak out if you see a pet left in the cold. If we all do what we can, then more and more pets will be able to survive the harsh winter. 

cat cooler         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information please call Advanced Animal Care of Mt. Pleasant @ 843-884-9838.

Sources:

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cold-weather-pet-safety.aspx

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cold-weather-tips

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/protect_pets_winter.html

http://cedarspringspost.com/2013/01/24/cold-weather-dangerous-for-pets/

 

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February is Pet Dental Month!


February is National Pet Dental Month! Now is the time to evaluate your pet’s oral hygiene health. Many pet owners do not realize that poor dental hygiene can lead to serious health issues. Studies have shown that dogs begin to experience gum disease by the age of 4 years old. It is also important to be able to notice signs of problems – bad breath, excessive drooling, inflamed gums, tumors in the gums, cysts under the tongue, and loose teeth. Don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with your vet to help you determine if your pet is on the right track to maintaining those pearly whites! Call Advanced Animal Care of Mt. Pleasant for more information @ 843-884-9838

The ASPCA has offered a great list of identifying mouth disorders:

  • Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
  • Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
  • Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
  • Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog’s teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
  • Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
  • Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
  • Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
  • Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.

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