Tag: #isleofpalms

With a Little Help From Our Friends….

Friends, we need some help finding homes for four cats. Actually two pairs.

In the ideal situation, we get kittens at a very young age before they have become conditioned to fear humans. Some kittens learn this from their mothers very, very soon after birth.  When we take in kittens that are 8-12 weeks old before they’ve known human contact, they tend to retain these “shy” characteristics even after they’ve learned that most people are “good” and would never hurt them. Their instinct is to retain a certain amount of healthy distrust, just to be on the safe side.  These are the cats that will run up to you for treats, talk to you and maybe even rub against your leg. They may also like to be petted and rubbed, but are most likely rarely going to want to be picked up.

We have two pairs of kitties that are somewhat “shy”. In addition to being born to feral mothers, they have lived the majority of their lives in a veterinary hospital. And while they are loved and cared for daily, it is not a true home. They deserve to have their own family.

Storm and Elmo:

Storm is an 18 mo old female/spayed dilute tortishell (patches of grey and peach). She was found as a tiny kitten in a dumpster on Clements Ferry Road. She is very independent and extremely active and athletic. Elmo is an 18 mo male/neutered black cat that has an absolutely fantastic personality. He is a third generation of a family of cats living under the cottages at Charles Pinckney Elementary School in Mt Pleasant. He is very, very smart and always very busy.  Both love to play and are very attached to one another.

Storm & Elmo

Pictured: Elmo (black) left, Storm (gray) right

Darwin and Jax:

Darwin is a 12 mo old male/neutered red and white tabby. He was found stray at about 8 weeks of age with his sister. After she was soon adopted, Darwin became a bit withdrawn and became less interactive. Jax is a 9 mo old male/neutered back cat with adorable linx tips on his ears.  Jax was also born beneath a cottage at Pinckney Elementary school; but probably 4th or 5th generation. He has always been very  shy, and therefore sat back as he watched his siblings being adopted out one by one. He and Darwin bonded instantly and are rarely seen very far apart. They are also very active, inquisitive cats that need more of a life than a clinic has to offer.

All four of these cats are extremely healthy and hardy. In addition to routine vaccinations, they have had the opportunity to develop real life immunity by growing up in an animal hospital. They are all smart, inquisitive and beautiful cats. They would all benefit from safe outdoor time as they would love to run and play and hunt. If you have room in your heart for either of these pairs of kitties, please let us know. Adoption fees are negotiable. For more information click here.

Darwin Sept 2014 Jax

Pictured: Darwin (orange) left, Jax (black) right

“The love for all living creatures is the noblest attribute of man.” – Charles Darwin

Cold Weater and Your Pets

N-Pets-in-cold-weather

It is difficult to see all the images thrown at us online of domesticated pets freezing to death outside. What is even more heartbreaking is seeing it with our own eyes. Although many people do comply with obvious pet care standards by bringing their pets inside during the coldest of nights, so many of our neighbors do not. It is important to help spread the word to others about the importance of making sure these animals have a warm place to sleep. It is understood that some people will NOT bring their “outside” dog or cat indoors, but there are ways you can make sure they have a warm shelter whether inside or not.

Here are a couple tips on how to keep those pets warm this winter:

Food & Water. Outdoor pets will require more calories during cold weather to generate more body heat to help keep them warm. Some pet owners think it is helpful to keep their pet’s weight on the heavy side to help protect them from the cold, but this is not true. It is more important that they keep and maintain a healthy body condition.  It is imperative that your pet has unlimited access to clean, non-frozen drinking water.

Shelter. Provide a warm, solid, dry structure that protects against gusts of winds. The floor of the shelter should be off the ground to help minimize loss of body heat. The door of the shelter should be positioned away from prevailing winds. Space heaters and heat lamps should be avoided because of risk of burns or fire. Exercise extreme caution when using heated pet mats which can also be capable of causing burns.         dog-shelter-2

Bedding. Bedding should be thick, dry, and changed regularly to provide a warm, dry environment.

ID Tags. It is very easy for cats and dogs to become lost during the winter. If they are not in a fenced in yard, they may start wondering in hopes of finding adequate shelter. Be sure your pets have a microchip, and/or collar with identification tags in case they are picked up and brought to a rescue or shelter.

Cars. Cats will often find temporary shelter underneath a car, on a tire, or even under the hood. Make sure to check your car before starting the engine and driving away. A couple knocks on the hood should be enough to wake up a sleeping kitty. It is also important not to leave your pets in the car during the winter, just as it is during the summer. Cars can serve as a type of refrigerator and keep the cold inside. Remember that puppies and kittens have an even harder time adapting to cold weather than adults.

Even if you do not own any outside dogs or cats, you can still provide temporarily shelter for the stray pets in your neighborhood. Styrofoam coolers with dry bedding and a small hole cut for an opening, can provide a makeshift shelter for stray felines, and is very cost effective. Please speak out if you see a pet left in the cold. If we all do what we can, then more and more pets will be able to survive the harsh winter. 

cat cooler         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information please call Advanced Animal Care of Mt. Pleasant @ 843-884-9838.

Sources:

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cold-weather-pet-safety.aspx

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cold-weather-tips

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/protect_pets_winter.html

http://cedarspringspost.com/2013/01/24/cold-weather-dangerous-for-pets/

 

Holiday Safety Tips for Your Pets

The holidays are here, and now is the time when we are busy wrapping presents, cooking delicious meals, and spending time with family.  Among the hustle and bustle, our pets are watching and waiting for an opportunity to get into mischief! Some may sneak a turkey leg when your back is turned, others may take a bite of that yummy chocolate cake, and then follow it up with a nice drink from the Christmas tree water. These seemingly normal holiday behaviors can result with you spending your holiday at the veterinary emergency hospital and all the money you’ve saved for presents has now gone towards Scruffy’s emergency surgery.  Here is a list of holiday safety tips to ensure you, your family, and your pets have a wonderful and safe holiday season!

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Try to Remember These Basic Tips –

  1.  Turkey Bones can cause stomach perforation and painful constipation. Often times, surgery is necessary to remove bone fragments from the intestines. Fatty foods can cause pancreatitis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the pancreas that produces toxic enzymes and causes illness and dehydration.
  2. Sugar-Free Baked Goods often contain xylitol, which causes blood pressure to decrease to dangerously low levels. Ingestion may result in vomiting, lethargy, loss of coordination, seizures, and liver failure.
  3. Chocolate stimulates the nervous system and heart in both dogs and cats. Dark chocolate poses a greater risk and can cause agitation, vomiting, diarrhea, increased heart rate, tremors, seizures, and even death.
  4. Holiday Plants are a favorite of our pets. Mistletoe and holly pose the biggest threat and causes vomiting, diarrhea and heart arrhythmia.
  5. Alcohol is for human consumption only! It depresses the nervous system and results in vomiting, disorientation, diarrhea, lethargy, difficulty breathing, tremors, comas, and seizures.
  6. Tinsel & Ribbons not only pose a choking hazard (please don’t use them as collars), but can also slice the digestive track and cause intestinal obstruction.
  7. Electrical cords should be turned off and unplugged when you aren’t home. Live cords can cause burns in or around your pet’s mouth, difficulty breathing, seizures, and cardiac arrest.
  8. Christmas Trees need to be properly secured, fragile glass ornaments should be kept off low-lying branches. If you have a real tree be sure you don’t add fertilizer to the tree water, and keep pets away from stagnant water sitting in the reservoir. Watch out for signs of vomiting and diarrhea if you know they’ve been near it!
  9. Holiday Visitors will be coming and going, and this much activity can be confusing and stressful for pets. Make sure they have a safe, quiet space to retreat to if necessary. Elderly and sick pets can be extra sensitive to over-stimulation. Products like Adaptil and Feliway are great to use for pets with many forms of anxiety. Signs of stress can show up as gastrointestinal issues, discomfort, diarrhea, and irritability.
  10. Imported Snow Globes have shown to contain antifreeze (ethylene glycol) in some cases. As little as 1 teaspoon ingested by a cat, or 2 tablespoon for a dog, can be fatal. Signs of ingestion include lack of coordination, excessive thirst, and lethargy. Immediate treatment by a veterinarian is imperative if you think your pet is at risk. Crystals develop in the kidneys resulting in acute kidney failure. Sometimes a pet will not show signs of distress until it is too late.
  11. Liquid Potpourri is sometimes not realized to be so dangerous for our pets – especially cats. Just a lick or two can result in chemical burns, fever, difficulty breathing, and tremors. Although dogs aren’t as sensitive, it is advised to still use caution.

Call Advanced Animal Care of Mount Pleasant for more information at 843-884-9838.

Please be aware that there is a $39 fee per incident when you call the Pet Poison Hotline at 1-855-764-7661.

If you have an emergency after hours, you can call Veterinary Emergency Care in Mt. Pleasant, SC at 843-216-7554.

AAC WISHES YOU AND YOUR PET A HAPPY AND SAFE HOLIDAY SEASON!

holiday pets

 

 

 

Update – Kittens have found loving homes!

We have four kittens and their mother who will be looking for a home soon! They are still nursing right now, but will begin vaccines soon. The mother is doing a wonderful job of caring for them, and they are thriving here at the hospital.  All four of them are males, and their adoption fee will include neuter, all vaccines, flea/heartworm treatment, dewormer, and a small bag of kitten food. Please call us if you have any questions about our adoption process @ 843-884-9838. Or you can fill out the contact form below.

 

John, Paul, George & Ringo
John, Paul, George & Ringo

 

 

Dog Bite Prevention May 18th – 24th

May 18-24, 2014, Is National Dog Bite Prevention Week!

Dog Bite Facts:Dog bite prevention

  • Each year, more than 4.5 million people in the U.S. are bitten by dogs.
  • Almost 1 in 5 people bitten by dogs require medical attention.
  • Every year, more than 800,000 Americans receive medical attention for dog bites; at least half of them are children.
  • Children are, by far, the most common victims of dog bites and are far more likely to be severely injured.
  • Most dog bites affecting young children occur during everyday activities and while interacting with familiar dogs.
  • Senior citizens are the second most common dog bite victims.

There are many things you can do to avoid dog bites, ranging from properly training and socializing your pet to educating your children on how – or if – they should approach a dog. Information and education are the best solutions for this public health crisis.

Visit the National Dog Bite Prevention Week page for more information and resources to educate people about dog bite prevention.

Source: https://www.avma.org

For any questions regarding dog bite prevention, or if you would like a behavioral consultation for your pet, please call 843-884-9838 or fill out the contact form.